Rescue Dog 101

Basic training and stress reduction exercises for your new rescue dog

Rescue Dog 101 was designed especially for pet parents of a new rescue dog. Our program takes into account the trauma that your rescue dog could have experienced prior to be matched with your family. This program focuses on exercises designed to relieve stress and anxiety. It also covers a variety of basic dog training exercises. This program includes 33 online training videos. Watch at home or train on the go.

The Rescue Dog 101 online course features sit, down, getting your dog used to his new name, attention games, come when called, using a crate, Tellington TTouch relaxation and stress reduction exercises, how to use food dispensing toys, targeting, go to your bed, and the top 10 must have dog items.

This program was developed to build a successful and safe relationship between your dog and family. We want to give all members of your family the tools they need to stay safe, to learn about dogs, and to respect all dogs. Plus, we want to give your dog skills that will help them be a good member of your family and community.

Many of the dog training exercises in the Good Dog program are kid friendly, meaning that your children can participate with adult supervision. Children under the age of twelve should always be supervised around a dog, even a family dog that you've known for years.

It's important to remember that every dog is unique, just as every child is unique. Each dog will have its own learning style and attention span. Your dog may learn some training games quickly, while others may take more practice. If your dog walks away in the middle of a training game or you're not getting the response you're hoping for, that's OK. Stop and come back later. The Good Dog program does not address aggressive or fear based behaviors in dogs, which require the assistance of a positive reinforcement dog training professional.

The training game videos you'll view in this account are meant to be adult supervised and repeated again and again throughout the month. Practicing in different rooms of the house, inside vs outside, and with different members of the family can keep things entertaining and exciting until a next set of lessons arrives. Consistency and repetition is the key to success. We recommend training sessions of 5 to 10 minutes at a time, one to several times per day.

We recommend watching the videos in the order provided. For the training game videos, we recommend mastering one game before moving to the next. Each training game builds on skills for future games. The exceptions are the TTouch exercises. These gentle petting and relaxation exercises can be used anywhere in the program with any frequency.

It is our hope that your family comes together to work with your family dog through this program and it provides many opportunities over the upcoming months to enjoy each other and have fun. Not every lesson will be perfect and not every dog will pick up a new skill on the first try, but that's OK. Keep practicing and feel free to contact us with questions or problems. Good luck and starting training!



Your Instructor


Jenn Merritt, CPDT-KA, BS
Jenn Merritt, CPDT-KA, BS

Jenn has been a professional dog trainer for more than 13 years. She has also been a guild certified Tellington TTouch companion animal practitioner for 10 years. Jenn is Fear Free certified, a Family Paws Parent Educator, a Maxwell Award nominee, and she's been published in “Dog Fancy,” “The Dog Trainer’s Resource 3,” and “The APDT Chronicle of the Dog.” She's also been seen on “CBS This Morning.” Jenn is the creator of the SAFE dog bite prevention program.


Course Curriculum



Frequently Asked Questions


When does the course start and finish?
The course starts now and you'll be provided continuous access to the training videos.
Why can't I enroll in this course?
Was this written by a professional dog trainer?
Yes it was. Jenn Merritt, CPDT-KA, BS, has been a professional reward based dog trainer for more than twelve years. She is also Fear Free certified and a Tellington TTouch Guild Member.
What does reward based training mean?
Reward based dog training or positive reinforcement dog training uses praise and/or treats to reward your dog for doing something you want him to do. Dogs quickly learn what behavior to repeat to get praise and rewards. Reward based training does not use punishment, force, or any type of training device that injures or hurts your dog.